The Way of Tea: Wellspring of Omotenashi, Part 1

  • Peter Barakan

    Host

    Born in London in 1951, Peter earned a degree in Japanese from the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). An expert on diverse forms of popular music, Peter is also a well-known TV and radio presenter. He has lived in Japan for 40 years and has a deep understanding of the language and culture.

  • Sochi Yamamoto

    Main guest

    Sochi Yamamoto is one of the few tea masters from the Urasenke tradition, one of Japan’s leading schools of tea. He teaches the way of tea to Japanese and foreigners alike. At the request of the government and companies, he also gives lectures on heartfelt omotenashi, or Japanese-style hospitality, and how it relates to tea ceremony.

  • Randy Channell Soei

    Guest

    Born in Edmonton, Canada, Randy Channell took up unarmed combat from an early age. Following time spent in Hong Kong in order to learn authentic kung fu, in 1985 he traveled to Japan to study the Japanese martial arts, working as an English teacher in the city of Matsumoto. He eventually decided to complement his martial prowess with deeper aesthetic insights through the traditional Japanese tea ceremony (chado/sado). Drawn deeper into this world, he relocated to the ancient capital city of Kyoto to study with Urasenke, one of Japan’s leading schools of tea. These days, having received the name Soei (in recognition of his devotion to the way of tea) and a tea instructor’s license, he spends his days guiding disciples.

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December 12, 2017

The Way of Tea: Wellspring of Omotenashi, Part 1

*You will leave the NHK website.

Preparing tea and serving it is the essence of tea ceremony, but the simple act of whisking green tea powder to a froth in hot water is governed by countless rules and manners. In such elaborate tea ceremony etiquette, we can see the roots of Japan's devotion to omotenashi, mindful hospitality. Our expert guest is tea master Sochi Yamamoto, who has been a student of the renowned Urasenke school of tea for 23 years.

*You will leave the NHK website.