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Japan-easy#21Which one would you like?/ Which one?

Formal and casual ways of talking

1. shimasu/suru

So today, we'll learn how to differentiate between the polite and casual ways of speaking.
Were you able to hear the words “shimasu” and “suru” in the video?
The two conversations were about the same thing, but one was polite and the other was casual.
First, here's the polite form.
Man: “Dotchi ni shimasuka?”
Lady: “Kono epuron ni shimasu. Kono epuron o tsukete ryōri shimasu.”

Next, the casual form.
Man: “Dotchi ni suru?”
Lady: “Kotchi ni suru. Kono epuron o tsukete ryōri suru.”

It looks like “shimasu” is polite and “suru” is the casual form of speaking to someone.
Remember that the casual form does not use “ka” at the end of questions.

2. Kanji-easy!

There are about 2,000 “kanji” that are regularly used.
This section will use various methods that will allow you to visualize kanji.
We hope you will become acquainted with kanji while having fun.

Japan has many festivals that promote the features of different regions.
Let's look at some festivals and learn the names of prefectures.

3. Ocha shimasenka?/Ocha shinai?

Today, we're comparing the polite way of speaking, “shimasu,” and the casual way, “suru.”
Now let's look at how to propose an idea.
When proposing to rest and go to a café or something, the polite form is “Ocha shimasenka?”
If the answer is yes, you say, “Sō shimashō.”

Now, let's see the casual form.
Since the two people in the casual version were friends, they used the casual form and said, “Sorosoro, ocha shinai?”
If the answer is yes, you say, “Īne, sō shiyō.”
And once again, for the casual question form, you don't add “ka.”

4. Phrase-easy!

You will learn useful Japanese phrases and real-life experiences relating to those phrases. On the menu today, we have the phrase “Mizu ni nagasu.”

Tea Break

Kurimonaka

Kurimonaka

Kurimonaka is a Japanese dessert that consists of a sweet bean paste and chestnut sandwiched between two thin slices of baked dough made of glutinous rice. It is said to have originated in the Edo Period over a century ago, as a full moon-shaped snack called a “monakatsuki.” This was later shortened to “monaka,” which became the basis for the “kurimonaka.” The kurimonaka is not in the shape of the moon, but a chestnut, and aside from bean paste fillings, may have chestnut paste inside as well. This is a delectable treat that brims with the autumn flavors of Japan.

Exercises
on the Net #21

Question 1

Instruction: Change the following verbs to the polite form (masu-form)

1

いくiku

(iku)

to go

Answer

いきますikimasu

(ikimasu)

2

たべるtaberu

(taberu)

to eat

Answer

たべますtabemasu

(tabemasu)

3

のむnomu

(nomu)

to drink

Answer

のみますnomimasu

(nomimasu)

Question 2

Instruction: Change the sentences with casual style to those with formal styles.

1

なにnanioしますshimasuka

(nani o shimasu ka)

What are you going to do?

Answer

なにnanioするsuru

(nani o suru)

2

テニスtenisuoしますshimas

(tenisu o shimasu)

I'm going to play tennis.

Answer

テニスtenisuoするsuru

(tenisu o suru)

Question 3

Instruction: Reading the dialogue below, choose four correct sentences to refer what they are talking.

(At lunch time in a small restaurant in Tokyo)

ボブbobuきむらkimuraさんsanなにnanioたべますか?tabemasuka

(kimura san nani o tabemasu ka)

English

Bob: What are you going to order, Mr. Kimura?

(At lunch time in a small restaurant in Tokyo)

きむらkimuraええとētoチーズchīzuバーガーbāgātoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīniするsuru

(chīzu bāgā to aisu kōhī ni suru)

English

Kimura: I want to have a cheese burger and iced coffee.

(At lunch time in a small restaurant in Tokyo)

ボブbobuわたしwatashiチーズchīzuバーガーbāgātoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīniしますshimasu

(watashi mo chīzu bāgā to aisu kōhī ni shimasu)

English

Bob: I'm going to have a cheese burger and iced coffee, too.

(At lunch time in a small restaurant in Tokyo)

ウェイターueitāチーズchīzuバーガーbāgāふたつfutatsutoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīふたつfutatsuですねdesune

(chīzu bāgā futatsu to aisu kōhī futatsu desune)

English

Waiter: So two cheese burgers and two iced coffee. Right?

かちょうkachōaわたしもwatashiチーズchīzuバーガーbāgātoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīniするsuru

(a watashi mo chīzu bāgā to aisu kōhī ni suru)

English

The Manager: Well, I'm going to have a cheeseburger and iced coffee, please.

ウェイターueitāすみませんsumimasenチーズchīzuバーガーbāgāmoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīmoうりきれurikireですdesu

(sumimasen chīzu bāgā mo aisu kōhī mo urikire desu)

English

Waiter: Sorry, sir. Cheese burger and iced coffee are sold out today.

Attention!
ええと (ēto) = well...
かちょう (kachō) = a manager
うりきれ (urikire) = sold out

1

きむらkimuraさんsanwaチーズchīzuバーガーbāgāoたべますtabemasu

(kimura san wa chīzu bāgā o tabemasu)

English

Mr. Kimura is going to have a cheeseburger.

Answer

correct

2

ボブbobuさんsanmoチーズchīzuバーガーbāgāoたべますtabemasu

(bobu san mo chīzu bāgā o tabemasu)

English

Bob, too, is going to have a cheeseburger.

Answer

correct

3

かちょうkachōmoチーズchīzuバーガーbāgāoたべますtabemasu

(kachō mo chīzu bāgā o tabemasu)

English

The manager, too, is going to have a cheeseburger.

Answer

wrong

4

ボブbobuさんsanmoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīoのみますnomimasu

(bobu san mo aisu kōhī o nomimasu)

English

Bob, too, is going to drink a glass of iced coffee.

Answer

correct

5

かちょうkachōmoアイスaisuコーヒーkōhīoのみますnomimasu

(kachō mo aisu kōhī o nomimasu)

English

The manager, too, is going to drink a glass of iced coffee.

Answer

wrong