Older people less likely to develop vaccine side effects Older people less likely to develop vaccine side effects
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Older people less likely to develop vaccine side effects

    This is part 94 of our coronavirus FAQ. Click here to read other installments: #Coronavirus the facts. Find the latest information and answers from experts on everything COVID-19.

    Elderly people suffer fewer side effects

    A study in Japan has found that elderly people are less likely to experience fever and other side effects from coronavirus vaccines than people in younger age groups.

    Health ministry researchers quizzed 19,000 medical workers who have been inoculated with the Pfizer vaccine since February. They compared the responses of people aged in their 20s with those aged 65 and above. After receiving the first dose:

    --25.2 percent in their 20s/12.4 percent aged 65 and older experienced fatigue.
    --23.3/11.9 percent reported a headache.
    --5.7/0.2 percent developed fever

    Moreover, among 16,000 people who had received the second dose:

    --76.8/38 percent experienced fatigue
    --62.7/20.5 percent reported a headache
    --51/9.4 percent developed fever

    The survey also found that women were more likely to suffer side effects than men.

    The information is accurate as of May 18, 2021.

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