Crispy Pork Dressing

When, for instance, bacon gets crispy, we call it "karikari" to mimic the sound of biting down on something hard.

Crispy Pork Dressing
Photographed by Takeshi Noguchi


Recipe by
Eiko Oba

Easy

Pork

Vegetables

440kcal

20minutes

Calorie count is per serving.

Ingredients (Serves 2)

  • 200 g pork belly (thinly sliced)
  • 1/2 head lettuce (200 g)
  • 1 tomato (small) (100 g)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • [A]

    • 1/3 tsp salt
    • A pinch of pepper
    • 1 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1/2 tbsp vegetable oil

Directions

1

Cut the lettuce into 3-4 cm squares and crisp them by soaking them in ice water for 5 minutes. Pat dry. Cut the tomato lengthwise in half, remove the stem, and cut into 1 cm wedges. Plate up the lettuce and tomatoes. Cut the garlic into thin slices. Cut the pork into 3-4 cm lengths.

2

Combine the vegetable oil, pork and garlic in a frying pan and stir-fry over medium heat until the pork changes color. Reduce the heat to low and stir-fry for 5-6 minutes until crisp. Turn off the heat and stir in [A], in the order in which the ingredients are listed.

3

Pour over the lettuce and tomatoes while hot.

Tips

Kushi-giri (cutting into wedges)

Used to cut tomatoes, onions and other round vegetables lengthwise in half and then into uniform wedges.

  1. Cut lengthwise in half.
  2. Remove the stem and core if necessary.
  3. Cut into uniform wedges.

Suitable ingredients:
Tomatoes, onions, cabbage, Japanese turnips, etc.

Stir-fry over low heat until crisp.

1. Combine the vegetable oil, pork and garlic before placing the pan over medium heat so that you start frying at a low temperature. Avoid high heat as this will cause the pork to burn.

2. Stir-fry the pork until the color changes. This tells you that it's done. Reduce the heat to low and continue frying.

3. As the fat in the meat will melt, the effect is almost like deep frying the pork and garlic. Fry until the pork is crisp and golden brown.

4. When making dressing with melted fat, turn off the heat before adding the seasonings to prevent splattering. The dressing tastes best when mixed while hot.