NHK WORLD

NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN(2)

Linking Japan to World in
18 Languages

When NHK resumed international broadcasting as Radio Japan after World War II, it broadcasted for only five hours a day in Japanese and English. Now it broadcasts in Japanese and 17 other languages for nearly 60 hours a day. Radio Japan also promotes events involving exchange with listeners. The staff visits various parts of the world to do public recordings of special programs. Right after the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011, more than five thousand listeners sent in heartening e-mails or letters from around the world.

Outline of Services  >  NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN(2)

ABOUT RADIO JAPAN
TIPS & QUIZZES
    TIPS:
  1. Main broadcast areas
  2. When service started
    Before WWII, After WWII

  3. QUIZZES:
  4. Quizzes by Radio Japan announcers
    How many questions can you answer correctly?
  5. A:Answers
JAPANESEありがとう
JAPANESE Announcer
  1. Almost all the world
  2. 6/1/1935, 2/1/1952

  3. Q1:What is the name of an interactive program aired on weekends in which Japanese living abroad take part by phone or e-mail?
ENGLISHThank you
ENGLISH Announcer
  1. Europe, Africa, Southeast Asia, Southwest Asia, Oceania
  2. 6/1/1935 , 2/1/1952

  3. Q2: What does BCL stand for?
    • Broadcasting Listening
    • Broadcasting Living
    • Broadcasting Learning
ARABICARABIC
ARABIC Announcer
  1. Middle East, North Africa
  2. 1/1/1941, 5/1/1954

  3. Q3:What does NHK in NHK WORLD stand for?
    • Nippon Hoso Kokusai
    • Nippon Haiku Kyokai
    • Nippon Hoso Kyokai
BENGALIBENGALI
BENGALI Announcer
  1. Southwest Asia
  2. 7/2/1943, 4/3/1961

  3. Q4:“Let’s Speak Japanese,” which began in 1958, is now called “ ______Japanese,” and is still on the air.
BURMESEBURMESE
BURMESE Announcer
  1. Southeast Asia
  2. 6/1/1940, 4/5/1965

  3. Q5:A radio drama in Burmese that aired in December 2014 was based on the novel ______written by a leading author in Myanmar, Journal Gyaw Ma Ma Lay.
CHINESECHINESE
CHINESE Announcer
  1. The Asian Continent
  2. 8/23/1937, 8/1/1953

  3. Q6:Some news programs on Radio Japan are also broadcast on NHK’s domestic channel Radio 2. They are in English,_____ , Korean, Spanish and Portuguese.
FRENCHMerci
FRENCH Announcer
  1. Africa
  2. 4/1/1937, 2/15/1954

  3. Q7:Radio Japan first opened an overseas relay station in Sines. This was followed by the _____Relay Station in the Gabonese Republic.
HINDIHINDI
HINDI Announcer
  1. Southwest Asia
  2. 6/1/1940, 10/1/1955

  3. Q8:In 2014, which country sent the most messages to Radio Japan by regular mail, fax or e-mail?
INDONESIATerima kasih
INDONESIA Announcer
  1. Southeast Asia
  2. 1/1/1941, 8/1/1953

  3. Q9:After WWII, international broadcasting in Japanese and English resumed first. Then came resumption of service in Thai, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Chinese and _____
KOREANKOREAN
KOREAN Announcer
  1. Korean Peninsula
  2. _____ , 4/1/1960

  3. Q10:The maximum output of a transmitter at KDDI’s Yamata Transmitting Station is _____kW.
PERSIANPERSIAN
PERSIAN Announcer
  1. Middle East, East Asia
  2. 10/11/1942, 4/1/1991

  3. Q11:The title of a special program to introduce the World Exposition in Osaka in 1970 was “Seeking Progress and_____ ”
PORTUGUESEObrigada(for women)
PORTUGUESE Announcer
  1. South America (Brazil)
  2. 1/1/1938, 8/1/1953

  3. Q12:Portuguese broadcasting starts at 6 p.m. Japan time. What time is it then in Brazil?
RUSSIANRUSSIAN
RUSSIAN Announcer
  1. Europe, Russian Far East
  2. 12/5/1942, 5/1/1956

  3. Q13:Who is the Nobel Prize winner for literature that appeared in “One in a Hundred Million,” one of the longest-running programs of Radio Japan?
SPANISHGracias
SPANISH Announcer
  1. Latin America
  2. 4/1/1937, 8/1/1953

  3. Q14:The name of a new program introduced when programming was revised in April 1963 was “Reporting on_____ from Tokyo.”
SWAHILIAsante
SWAHILI Announcer
  1. Africa (East)
  2. _____ , 4/6/1964

  3. Q15:What is the name of a broadcaster that airs Radio Japan’s Swahili programs on its FM network in Tanzania?
THAITHAI
THAI Announcer
  1. Southeast Asia
  2. 6/1/1940, 12/1/1953

  3. Q16:What is the shortened name of the international radio broadcasting automatic transmitting system called an “announce machine”: ana-machi, ana-man or AM?
URDUURDU
URDU Announcer
  1. Southwest Asia
  2. 12/3/1942, 10/1/1955

  3. Q17:NHK’s international radio broadcasting before and during WWII was called Radio_____


VIETNAMESEVIETNAMESE
VIETNAMESE Announcer
  1. Southeast Asia
  2. _____ , 4/3/1961

  3. Q18:The key figure in “Easy Japanese” from fiscal 2011 to 2014 was Cuong. What country was he from?

EXCHANGES WITH LISTENERS

Letters to encourage Japan arrived from all over the world after the Great East Japan Earthquake (3/2011).

Letters to encourage Japan arrived from all over the world after the Great East Japan Earthquake (3/2011).

“Let’s Try to Sing Japanese Songs! A Contest,” an amateur singing contest of Japanese songs (10/20I3, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam).

“Let’s Try to Sing Japanese Songs! A Contest,” an amateur singing contest of Japanese songs (10/20I3, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam).

After a public recording of “Listeners’ Corner” in Swahili (4/2014, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania).

After a public recording of “Listeners’ Corner” in Swahili (4/2014, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania).

Advertising NHK WORLD at Japan-Myanmar Festival (12/2014, in Yangon, Myanmar).

Advertising NHK WORLD at Japan-Myanmar Festival (12/2014, in Yangon, Myanmar).

Messages in pictures from children in Iraq.

Messages in pictures from children in Iraq.

A Rough Start for Persian Service

In 1991, one language was added to Radio Japan’s services, for a total of 22. It was Persian, which is spoken mainly in Iran.

Former Tokyo University of Foreign Studies professor Emiko Okada played an important role in starting the service. She recalls, “It was really hard to find announcers and translators.” There were none among the Iranians living in Japan who had worked in broadcasting. She looked for candidates by using her long list of acquaintances, including students and even carpet importers. Okada herself had worked for Radio Japan’s Arabic broadcasting for about one and a half years, from 1967. Persian and Arabic have a lot in common in terms of characters and vocabulary. So she gathered candidates for translating or announcing in study groups, and taught them how to translate scripts for broadcasts and read them on the air. The groups learned, for example, how fast they should read news scripts to ensure that listeners could follow along. They worked hard to get ready.

Now, 14 announcers take turns airing three 30-minute Persian broadcasts a day. Some of them are veterans who’ve worked in the service from the start. The others are students, company employees and a journalist invited from Iran. Okada says with a smile that the efforts made back then are now paying off.