TOKYO EYE 2020

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February 27, 2019

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500 Eye-Opening Tokyo Moments: Part 2

This time, we take a look back at 500 episodes of Tokyo Eye 2020 with a two-part retrospective. In part two, we see how areas like Shinjuku and Ginza have changed over the years, and how the Tokyo Bay area is preparing for the 2020 games.

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PREVIOUS SHOW

February 20, 2019

500 Eye-Opening Tokyo Moments: Part 1

highlights

We take a look back at 500 episodes of Tokyo Eye 2020 with a two-part retrospective on the many ways we've showcased our favorite city. In part one, we take a cruise down the Sumida River and reflect on the show's early years.

Further Info

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Highlights

1) Tokyo Skytree Towering 634 meters high, this is the world's tallest broadcast tower. Completed in 2012. 333-meter-high Tokyo Tower was once the city's broadcast tower, but surrounding high-rise buildings made its signals less effective. Skytree was built to reduce that issue.
Address: 1-1-2 Oshiage, Sumida-ku

2) Kaminarimon This famous Asakusa landmark features a giant lantern that's 3.9 meters tall, 3.3 meters wide and about 700 kilograms. Beyond lies a 1,400-year-old shopping street called Nakamise and Sensoji, the city's oldest temple.
Address: 1-2-3 Asakusa, Taito-ku

3) Kokugikan An arena where important sumo tournaments take place in January, May and September. Also hosts other sporting events. Many sumo stables are located in the area, Ryogoku, making it known as a sumo town.
Address: 1-3-28 Yokoami, Sumida-kuAddress: 1-2-3 Asakusa, Taito-ku

<Sumida River Bridges> None of the nearly 20 bridges that span the Sumida River share the same design. Many of them were built in the reconstruction period following the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake that decimated Tokyo.

4) Kiyosu Bridge A suspension bridge built in 1928. Modeled after a suspension bridge in Cologne, Germany, considered at the time to be the world's most beautiful. Registered as an Important Cultural Property.
Location: Between Nihonbashinakasu, Chuo-ku and Kiyosumi, Koto-ku

5) Tsukishima Known for its many monjayaki restaurants locked in fierce competition, Tsukishima retains the feel of down-home shitamachi Tokyo. A piece of reclaimed land, it was constructed in 1892 from sediment that had accumulated at the mouth of the Sumida River.
Location: Tsukishima, Chuo-ku

Reporters

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Adam Fulford

Nationality:
British
Occupation:
Company CEO
When did you first come to Japan?:
1981
Reason for coming to Japan:
To teach English
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Estella Mak

Nationality:
Canadian
Occupation:
TV news producer, reporter, interpreter
When did you first come to Japan?:
In 1992.
Reason for coming to Japan:
I grew up in Hong Kong, but I've always loved Japanese culture. After studying Japanese at University in Canada, I was thrilled to come and see the real Japan. I am captivated by the beautiful scenery, delicious food, festivals, and most of all, the polite and warm people.
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John Daub

Nationality:
USA
Occupation:
Program Director / Journalist
When did you first come to Japan?:
18 years
Reason for coming to Japan:
Curiosity. It's also the same reason I remain in Japan, discovering something new and amazing almost every day! 
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